Consultores

Faculty Biographical Information

Stephen H. Amosson: Associate Professor and Extension Economist-Management, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, District 1. He received his B.S. in Animal Science at Iowa State University, M.S. in Agricultural Economics at Iowa State University, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Dr. Amosson maintains an active applied research program in a number of areas concerning farm management. Special Focus: Farm management, computer applications, and animal health. E-mail: s-amosson@tamu.edu

Carl G. Anderson: Professor and Extension Economist-Cotton Marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economic/Texas Agricultural Extension Service at Texas A&M University. He received a B.S. from Texas A&M University, M.S. from Louisiania State University, and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University. His research activities include price risk management and price discovery processes; basis and bases risk implications; cotton program implications and alternative impacts; and cotton standards, quality measurements, and relative component values of fiber attributes as applied to regional and interregional competition. E-mail: c-anderson@tamu.edu

David A. Bessler: Professor of Agricultural Economics. He received a B.S. in Economics and M.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Arizona, and Ph.D. is in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Davis. His research is in the area of applied decision analysis, especially as it contributes to understanding agricultural price uncertainty. He teaches graduate courses in research methodology and applied times series analysis. Special Focus: Decisions under risk, price dynamics, and agricultural history. E-mail: d-bessler@tamu.edu

Stanley J. Bevers: Assistant Professor and Extension Economist-Management for the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, District 3 at Vernon, Texas. He received a B.S. degree in Agricultural Education from Cameron University in Lawton, Okhahoma and M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. His current programming efforts are in ranch management and analysis, agricultural computer applications and education, and marketing. He has coordinated more than 100 short courses ranging from alternative marketing to computer applications. E-mail: s-bevers@tamu.edu

Frederick O. Boadu: Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. He received a B.A. in Economics at Berea College, M.A. Program in Law and Economics at the University of Miami, J.D. in Law at Georgia State University, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics at the University of Kentucky. His research focuses on applying tools in law and economics to address issues in international trade law and economics, economic development, resource economics, international environment policy, and constitutional economics. He teaches a course in agricultural law and natural resource economics at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Special Focus: Agricultural law and international trade. E-mail: f-boadu@tamu.edu

Oral Capps, Jr.: Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University, specializing in demand analysis, food distribution, and applied econometrics. He received his B.S. in Mathematics, M.S. in Statistics, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics, all from Virginia Tech. Dr. Capps specializes in research that deals with scanning data from retail stores and supermarkets, and also on consumption patterns of convenience foods: beef, fish, shellfish, lamb, and food away from home. He has been involved in both graduate and undergraduate teaching activities. Special Focus: Econometrics, market analysis, and statistical theory. E-mail: ocapps@tamu.edu

Gregory M. Clary: Associate Professor and Extension Economist-Management, for the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Districts 5 and 9. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. at Texas A&M University, all in Agricultural Economics. Dr. Clary has taught undergraduate courses in agricultural marketing, agribusiness management, and agricultural sales, advertising, and merchandising. Special Focus: Management and marketing. E-mail: g-clary@tamu.edu

J. Richard Conner: Professor of Agricultural Economics and Thomas M. O'Connor Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Management. He received his B.S. in Agronomy, M.S. in Statistics, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics, all from Texas A&M University. Dr. Conner's research emphasizes the integration of economics with ecology in the management of grazinglands and related resources. His teaching program includes a graduate course in range economics and participation in a team-taught undergraduate course in range analysis and management planning. Special Focus: Ranch management, range economics, and production economics. E-mail: jrc@tamu.edu

Gerald G. Cornforth: Extension Economist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. He received his B.S. from Oklahoma State, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, all in Agricultural Economics. His research includes work in production economics, financial management, marketing, IRM, computer application, and agribusiness management. Special Focus: Production economics, financial management, marketing, IRM, computer application, income tax, estate planning, and agri-business management. E-mail: g-cornforth@tamu.edu

Ernest E. Davis: Professor and Extension Economist in Livestock Marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. He received his B.S. in Animal Science from Oklahoma State University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics, both from Texas A&M University. His research includes international trade in livestock and livestock products, marketing alternative evaluation, price risk management strategies, market outlook, and value added opportunities for Texas livestock and livestock products. Special Focus: Marketing, policy, and outlook. E-mail: eed@tamu.edu

Richard A. Edwards: Professor and Extension Economist for the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. He received his B.S. in Industrial Engineering at Purdue University, his M.S. in Industrial Management at Georgia Tech, and his Ph.D. in Business at the University of Georgia. He has become nationally recognized for his work with the farm equipment industry, food distribution sector, labor laws affecting farmers and ranchers, in developing training programs in Agribusiness Management, Marketing and policy for participants from the former Soviet republics. E-mail: redwards@tamu.edu

William F. Edwards: Professor of Agricultural Economics in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Professor Edwards received his B.S. from Clemson University in Industrial Management, M.B.A. from Indiana University, and Ph.D. from the University of Florida in Economic Theory, Corporate Finance, and Agricultural Economics. Professor Edwards' past research and publications have focussed on policy analysis in the use of agricultural pesticides, subsidies to the dairy industry, the design of management information systems, and optimal inventory control for small business management. E-mail address: f-edwards@tamu.edu

Paul Ellinger: Assistant professor in Agribusiness and Finance in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University and adjunct professor in the Department of Finance. Dr. Ellinger received both a B.S.and M.S. in Agricultural Economics, and a Ph.D. in Finance at the University of Illinois. Dr. Ellinger has undergraduate and graduate teaching responsibilities in agribusiness management and finance. His research efforts have concentrated on merger activity, corporate structure and management of financial institutions. Additionally, Dr. Ellinger has focused on assessing analytical procedures to measure financial performance of individual firms. E-mail: p-ellinger@tamu.edu

Larry Falconer: Assistant Professor for the Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension Specialist for District 14 of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Falconer received his B.S. and M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Oklahoma State University, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University. Dr. Falconer's main research work has been directed towards firm level investment problems, particularly involving beef cattle. Mr. Falconer has been directly involved in the development of the National Cattlemen's Association Integrated Resource Management Standardized Performance Analysis effort both for cow-calf and stocker cattle operations. E-mail: l-falconer@tamu.edu

W. Judon Farmbrough: Senior lecturer and attorney at law with the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University at College Station, Texas. He holds a B.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Arkansas, and a M.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Missouri, and also a J.D. (Juris Doctorate) degree in Law from the University of Missouri. He teaches an Oil and Gas Law Course in the Agricultural Economics Department at Texas A&M University.

Donald E. Farris: Professor in Agricultural/Food Marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. He holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Arkansas, a M.S. in Horticulture from the University of Arkansas, and a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from North Carolina State University. His research program is focused on livestock and meat economics, marketing, and agricultural development. He teaches livestock and meat marketing at the undergraduate level, and agricultural marketing operations at the graduate level. a href="mailto:d-farris@tamu.edu">E-mail: d-farris@tamu.edu

Dennis U. Fisher: Professor of Agricultural Economics and Extension Economist for the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. He received his B.S. in Agriculture at Washington State University, his M.A. in Economics at Michigan State University, and his Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics at Michigan State University. Dr. Fisher has consulted extensively with government and retail, and service and manufacturing firms throughout the United States, advising them on economic development, market analysis and other business and economic areas. E-mail: d-fisher@tamu.edu

Stephen W. Fuller: Professor in marketing and transportation in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., in Agricultural Economics from Kansas State University, and Ph.D. in Economics from Kansas State University. Research is currently focused on evaluating the effect of the NAFTA on the U.S. onion industry, the effects of quality on U.S. wheat, corn and sorghum exports to Mexico, identification of transportation corridors important for U.S. grain/soybean exports to Mexico, and the development of an international grain transportation/logistics model. Dr. Fuller teaches undergraduate courses in price analyses. E-mail: sfuller@tamu.edu

Arthur R. Gerlow: Professor and Extension Economist in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from Louisiana State University, all in Agricultural Economics. His professional activities include annual participation in the National Rice Outlook Conference and annual experiment station reviews. E-mail: a-gerlow@tamu.edu

Harold L. Goodwin, Jr.: Associate Professor in Marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Agricultural Education, M.S. in Agricultural Economics, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics, all from Oklahoma State University. His research program is concerned with marketing and market research of agricultural and related products and in food system organization. Dr. Goodwin has both undergraduate and graduate teaching responsibilities in agricultural market analysis and marketing research. Special Focus: Market research, marketing, and labor. E-mail: hlgoodwin@tamu.edu

Ronald C. Griffin: Professor of Natural Resources Economics in the Department of Agricultural onomics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Mathematics, M.S. in Economics from Colorado State University, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Wisconsin. His research specializes in the study of water resource issues: consumption alternatives for producers and consumers, management decisions confronting water supplies and purveyors, and policy choices for the state. Dr. Griffin's teaching responsibilities include undergraduate and graduate course in natural resources economics. Special Focus: Resource and welfare economics. E-mail: rgriffin@tamu.edu

Wade L. Griffin: Professor in Production and Resource Economics in the Department of Agriculture at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from Texas Tech University, and Ph.D., from Oregon State University, all in Agricultural Economics. His research program is concerned with the economics of aquaculture and wild stock harvesting, emphasizing shrimp, catfish and red drum along the Texas Gulf Coast. Dr. Griffin's teaching responsibilities are in the undergraduate program. Special focus: Production economics and aquaculture. E-mail: wgriffin@tamu.edu

Michael G. Haby: Associate Professor and Extension Economist with Texas A&M University. Dr. Haby graduated from Texas A&M University with a B.B.A. in Marketing and M.S. in Management. His research focuses on seafood/aquaculture industry marketing and management issues as well as the design and implementation of seafood quality and safety management systems for the retail food sector. E-mail: m-haby@tamu.edu

Charles R. Hall: Assistant Professor and Extension Economist - Horticultural Marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Tennessee, M.S. in Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Design from the University of Tennessee, and Ph.D. from Mississippi State University. His research focuses on the economic and marketing aspects of horticultural products produced in Texas including all fruits, vegetables, and nursery crops. Special Focus: Horticulture Marketing. E-mail: c-hall@tamu.edu

Wayne A. Hayenga: Professor and Extension Specialist. Received his B.S. in Agriculture, M.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Illinois, M.B.A. in Finance and a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Michigan State University. In 1979 he completed a J.D. from Southern Methodist University. E-mail: w-hayenga@tamu.edu

Lonnie L. Jones: Professor and Resource Economist with Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Agricultural Education from Stephen F. Austin University, M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Louisiana State University and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Ohio State University. His research is concerned with economic development and natural resource use and planning with emphasis is on rural agricultural, industrial and tourism development and on water and land management in agriculture and urban areas. Dr. Jones has teaching responsibilities in undergraduate and graduate courses pertaining to quantitative analysis, economic development of rural areas and special problems in input-output analysis. Special Focus: Resource economics and development. E-mail: lljones@tamu.edu

Ronald D. Kay: Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in General Agriculture at Iowa State University, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics at Iowa State University. His research has been in the area of income taxes and their affect on management decisions. Dr. Kay is the author of a farm management textbook which is in its third edition. Dr. Kay's primary responsibility at Texas A&M University has been teaching, primarily in the area of farm management and production economics. He has also worked in the undergraduate office as an adviser and counselor. Special Focus: Farm management and production economics. E-mail: rkay@tamu.edu

Danny A. Klinefelter: Professor and Extension Economist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Received his B.S. in Agricultural Economics from Southern Illinios University, M.S. and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Illinois He grew up on a grain and livestock operation in central Illinois and maintains an interest in the family corporation. In addition to his academic and banking experience, Danny has authored or co- authored numerous professional articles and publications. Special Focus: Finance and management. E-mail: d-klinefelter@tamu.edu

Thomas O. Knight: Associate Professor of Production Economics and Farm Management in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from Oklahoma State University and Ph.D from the University of Missouri. His research efforts at Texas A&M University have been concerned with extension information delivery, evaluation of crop production alternatives, producer response to commodity policy, and the influence of lender credit practices on agricultural producers' production decisions. Dr. Knight has teaching responsibilities in graduate level production economics and risk analysis. Special Focus: Farm and risk management. E-mail: knight@tamu.edu

Ronald D. Knutson: Professor and Director of the in Agricultural and Food Policy Center at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, and M.S. at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Knutson is known for his candid analysis of problems and his frank evaluation of their implications for farmers, agribusinessmen, and policymakers. Special Focus: Policy marketing, rural development, and cooperatives. E-mail: r-knutson@tamu.edu

Ronald D. Lacewell: Professor in Resources Economics in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Texas Tech University, and his Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Oklahoma State University. His research centers on the areas of irrigation, integrated pest management, dairy waste management, farming systems, water quality and new crops. Dr. Lacewell's teaching responsibilities are in graduate production economics. Special Focus: Resources, production, and farm management. E-mail: r-lacewell@tamu.edu

Curtis F. Lard: Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Agriculture at the University of Tennessee, M.S. and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Dr. Lard's current research activities involve an economic study of the green industry of Texas. Previous research and publications have been in the areas of managerial decision making, farm planning, firm growth and production economics. Dr. Lard currently teaches such courses as Agricultural Economics and Farm and Ranch Management. Special Focus: Farm and ranch management and real estate economics. E-mail: c-lard@tamu.edu

David J. Leatham: Associate Professor in agricultural finance in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from Brigham Young University and Ph.D. from Purdue University, all in Agricultural Economics. Dr. Leatham's research program is directed toward the managerial finance problems of producers, agribusiness firms, and financial intermediaries serving agriculture and rural communities. Dr. Leatham has teaching responsibilities in undergraduate and graduate agricultural finance. Special Focus: Agricultural finance, farm financial management. E-mail: d-leatham@tamu.edu

Lawrence A. Lippke: Professor and Extension Economist-Management in the Department of Agricultural Economics, TAEX. Received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, all in Agricultural Economics. His extension program focuses on the development and dissemination of educational materials to assist in evaluating and implementing farm programs, use of computers in agriculture, farm and ranch accounting systems, and crop production economics. Special Focus: Management, marketing, finance, and policy. E-mail: lalippke@tamu.edu

Kerry K. Litzenberg: Professor and Director of Undergraduate Program in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Agricultural Education, M.S. in Educational Counseling and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economic. His primary activities have included teaching and research in: agribusiness management, food and agriculture sales and sales management, human resource planning and performance appraisal and application of computers and quantitative techniques for decision making. Special Focus: Agribusiness management and computer applications. E-mail: litz@tamu.edu

H. Alan Love: Assistant Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. from the University of Kentucky, M.S. from the University of Minnesota, and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. His research program is concerned with measuring the effects of market concentration in domestic and international agricultural markets on producers and consumers. He has teaching responsibilities in graduate agricultural trade and agricultural marketing classes, and has supervised five graduate theses. Special Focus: Policy and marketing. E-mail address: alove@tamu.edu

James M. Mjelde: Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received a B.S. in Biology, M.S. in Applied Economics from Montana State University, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Illinois. His research emphasis focuses on modeling farm level production processes and the economics of information in production agriculture, with particular expertise in mathematical modeling of dynamic processes. Special Focus: Production and resource economics. e-mail address: j- mjelde@tamu.edu

Bruce A. McCarl: Professor of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Business Statistics at the University of Colorado and Ph.D. in Management Science from Pennsylvania State University. His recent research efforts have largely involved policy analysis (mainly resources and government programs) as well as the proper application of quantitative methods to such analyses. Dr. McCarl has teaching responsibilities in the graduate program teaching a course in applied mathematical programming and applied risk analysis. Special Focus: Production and resource economics, policy. E-mail: mccarl@tamu.edu

James M. McGrann: Professor and Extension Economist-Management in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from Washington State University and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University. His extension and research program is concerned with computerized finance and economic management information and decision support systems for livestock producers. Dr. McGrann's research is focused on the development of the National Standardized Performance Analysis (SPA) systems for the beef cattle producers. Special Focus: Software development for farm and ranch management. E-mail: jmcgrann@tamu.edu

Gene Nelson: Professor and Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. from Western Illinois University and M.S. and Ph.D. from Purdue University in Agricultural Economics. His research and extension programs have emphasized risk analysis in farm decision making. His professional activities include President of the Western Agricultural Economics Association; Member of the Technical Advisory Committee for the Western Computer Consortium; Member of several CSRS Review Panels; and Reviewer of proposals for the National Science Foundation Decision, Risk, and Management Science Program. Special Focus: Financial and risk management. E-mail: nelsong@tamu.edu

John P. Nichols: Professor and Associate Head for Research in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. from Cornell University, M.S. from Michigan State University in Horticulture, and Ph.D. from Cornell University in Agricultural Economics. His research and teaching program includes agricultural and food product marketing and policy. Dr. Nichols' teaching responsibilities include courses in agricultural and food marketing and policy. He also teaches marketing management and planning and serves as advisor to the undergraduate NAMA marketing team. Special Focus: Marketing management and international agribusiness. e-mail address: jpn@tamu.edu

Joe Outlaw: Assistant Research Scientist in the Agricultural and Food Policy Center in the Department of Agricultural Economics. Received his B.S, M.S., and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, all in Agricultural Economics. His research has been directed toward agricultural policy issues with emphasis on dairy issues. Special Focus: Agricultural and food policy and production economics. E-mail: joutlaw@tamu.edu

Teofilo Ozuna: Assistant Professor in Quantitative Methods and Resource and Environmental Economics in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, all in Agricultural Economics. His research focuses on developing, improving, and applying econometric methods for selected facets of natural resource and environmental policy issues of concern to Texas, the U. S., and international domain. Dr. Ozuna teaches a course in quantitative methods and a graduate course in advanced natural resource economics. He also teaches a course on economic impact analysis as it relates to natural resource issues. Special Focus: Quantitative methods, economics impact analysis, resource economics. E-mail: tozuna@tamu.edu

Daniel I. Padberg: Professor in Agricultural and Food Marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from University of Missouri, and Ph.D. from University of California at Berkeley. Most of Dr. Padberg's research relates to the part of the food marketing system nearest to the consumer. His teaching program includes the first course in agricultural and food marketing. Special Focus: Agricultural marketing and market structure, food policy and research methods. E-mail: d-padberg@tamu.edu

Amy Pagano: Assistant Research Scientist in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received her B.A. in History from Hope College, M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Michigan State University, and Ph.D. in Food and Resource Economics. Her research focuses on environmental policy analysis and teaching responsibilities include AGEC 485 and 685. She is a member of the American and Southern Agricultural Economics Association and Society of Risk Analysis. e-mail address: pagano@tamu.edu

Jose G. Pena: Associate Professor and Extension Economist-Management. Received B.S. degrees in Animal Science and Horticulture and M.S. in Agricultural Economics, all from Texas A&M University. His research includes a concentrated interest in vegetable, pecan, fruit orchard and greenhouse production economics. He is often asked to address specific economic topics in these special interest activities at the state and national level. e-mail address: jg-pena@tamu.edu

John B. Penson Jr.: Stiles Professor of Agriculture in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from Southern Illinois University, and Ph.D from the University of Illinois. Dr. Penson conducts research in the areas of finance and the macroeconomics of agriculture. Special Focus: Agricultural finance, macro-economics of agriculture. e-mail address: jpenson@tamu.edu

James W. Richardson: Professor of Agricultural Policy in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. from New Mexico State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University. His research is focused on evaluating the economic consequences of alternative farm programs, tax provisions, and macroeconomic policies. Dr. Richardson has teaching responsibilities at the graduate level in agricultural policy and has recently initiated a new course concerning the development and use of simulation models for analyzing agricultural systems. Special Focus: Policy, taxes, and income analysis. e-mail address: jwrichardson@tamu.edu

M. Edward Rister: Professor in Production Economics and Farm Management in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from Texas A&M University and Ph.D. from Michigan State University, all in Agricultural Economics. His research efforts at Texas A&M University have been concerned with the economics of alternative crop mixes, grain marketing strategies, optimal input (e.g., fertilizer, irrigation, water) levels, economics of rice quality, impacts of lender credit criteria on producer viability, and farm machinery replacement policies, among other areas. Dr. Rister has teaching responsibilities in undergraduate and graduate farm management, with his senior level course focused on the use of microcomputers in farm management. Special Focus: Production economics and farm management. e-mail address: e-rister@tamu.edu

C. Parr Rosson: Professor and Extension Economist at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Agronomy, M.S. in Agricultural Economics, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics, all from Texas A&M University. Dr. Rosson is active in the American Agricultural Economics Association, the Southern Agricultural Economics Association, the International Agricultural Economics Association, and the International Agribusiness Management Association. Special Focus: International trade and marketing. e-mail address: prosson@tamu.edu

Atanu Saha: Assistant Professor in Development Economics and Econometrics in the Department of Agriculture at Texas A&M University. Received his B.A. from Jadavpur University, India, M.A. in Economics from University of Alberta, Canada and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from University of California, Davis. The focus of Dr. Saha's research is on modelling optimal choices under uncertainty. He teaches Development Economics, Risk Analysis and Econometrics. Dr. Saha is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association, the American Economics Association, and the Southern Agricultural Economics Association. Special Focus: Economic theory and model development. e-mail address: a-saha@tamu.edu

Ivan W. Schmedemann: Professor with the Real Estate Center and the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. In addition to teaching, he directs the Land Economics and Real Estate Graduate Program at Texas A&M, which consists of some 40 graduate students. Received a B.S., M.S. from Kansas State University and a Ph.D. from Texas A&M University. For many years his research projects concerned analysis of the various aspects of the rural land market in Texas. Currently Dr. Schmedemann teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in Land Economics and Real Estate Appraisal. Dr. Schmedemann is a member of the Texas Society of Professional Land Managers and Appraisers; the Association of Texas Real Estate Economists; the American Society of Farm Review and Rural Appraisers and the National Association of Review Appraisers. He holds membership in the Honorary societies of Blue Key, Alpha Zeta, Gamma Sigma Delta, and Phi Kappa Phi. Special Focus: Land Economics.

Vernon S. Schneider: Distinguished Professor in Agribusiness Management in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Agricultural Journalism from the University of Missouri, M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Purdue University, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics and Statistics from Oregon State University. Along with his teaching and research responsibilities, Dr. Schneider has been instrumental in organizing the Agricultural Cooperative Development (ACDI) 1969-73, and Volunteers for Cooperative Action 1970-73. In addition he was the Founding President of the International Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA) 1990, and presently serves as President of IAMA 1994-1995. Special Focus: Agribusiness management and cooperatives. e-mail address: vschneider@tamu.edu

Robert B. "Bud" Schwart, Jr.: Professor and Extension Specialist in Dairy Marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Ag Economics from the University of Illinois, M.S. and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from The Ohio State University ``Bud'' is a member of Epsilon Sigma Phi, American Agricultural Economics Association, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, Western Agricultural Economics Association, Dairy Shrine and the TAEX Specialist Association. Special Focus: Dairy marketing. e-mail address: rschwart@tamu.edu

Carl E. Shafer: Professor in Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S. from Oklahoma State University, and Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University in Agricultural Economics. His research and teaching program includes agricultural marketing, price analysis and commodity futures markets. Recent research interests include analyses of price behavior for horticultural crops and cotton, minimum price risk hedge ratios, and hedging strategies. Dr. Shafer regularly teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in price analysis/marketing and commodity futures markets. He serves as Coordinator for the Commodity Analysis specialty for the Master of Agriculture degree. Special Focus: Marketing strategies, price analysis, and futures markets. e-mail address: cshafer@tamu.edu

C. Richard Shumway: Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis, all in Agricultural Economics. His research efforts at Texas A&M University have been concerned with the economics of farm and research management and industry-level supply and demand response. Dr. Shumway has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses, including production economics, research methodology, applied econometrics, microeconomic theory, and economics of agribusiness. Professor Shumway has been a past President of the Western Agricultural Economics Association (1989-90), editor of the Western Journal of Agricultural Economics (1986-88), and Speaker of the Texas A&M University Faculty Senate (1987-88). Special Focus: Production Economics. e-mail address: rshumway@tamu.edu

Edward G. Smith: Extension Economist - Marketing and Policy and Distinguished Roy B. Davis Professor of Agricultural Cooperation in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Dr. Smith received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, all in Agricultural Economics. Research and extension programs designed to assist cooperatives and other agribusiness clientele in operational and strategic planning. Special Focus: Cooperatives, marketing, and policy. e-mail address: egsmith@tamu.edu

Jackie G. Smith: Professor and an Extension Economist for the Texas Agricultural Extension Service in Lubbock. Received his B.S. in Agricultural Economics at Texas Tech University, M.S. in Agricultural Economics at the University of Florida, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics at Oklahoma State University. Dr. Smith's research has concerned farm and ranch management and production economics, specifically focusing on marketing, budgeting, and computerized record keeping. Dr. Smith's efforts and expertise in teaching computer short courses were instrumental in the establishment of the Texas A&M Computer Training and Education Center at Halfway. In the Agricultural Economics Department, Dr. Smith serves on the Faculty Evaluation, Peer Teaching Evaluation and Capital Campaign Committees. Special Focus: e-mail address: j-smith@tamu.edu

Roland D. Smith: Professor and Associate Head for Extension in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Plant & Soil Science at Texas A&M University M.S. at Oklahoma State University and Ph.D. from Purdue University, both in Agricultural Economics. Professor Smith's professional activities include service on the Extension Affairs and the Extension Awards committees of the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). He has coordinated the review and selection of contributed papers in the extension education and teaching categories of the AAEA and the Southern Agricultural Economics Association (SAEA). Dr. Smith was elected chairman of the Southern Extension Marketing Committee in 1984 and has been a member of two CSRS Review Panels--Georgia and Arkansas. He also serves on the Board of Directors of the Texas Agricultural Cooperative Council. Special Focus: Agribusiness management. e-mail address: rdsmith@tamu.edu

Kenneth W. Stokes: Professor and Extension Specialist with Texas A&M University's Department of Agricultural Economics, located at the Texas A&M Research and Extension Center at Dallas. Received his B.S. and M.S. in Agricultural Economics at Texas Tech University, and Ph.D. at Texas A&M University. Recent research efforts include teaching and evaluating low cost financial and production record keeping computer software, developing case studies to demonstrate the preparation of accrual adjusted financial statements, training members of agricultural marketing clubs to evaluate alternative pricing methods using futures and options markets, and determining cost effective solutions to the planning, implementing and controlling functions of full-time commercial producers. Dr. Stokes is a member of the American and Southern Agricultural Economics Associations and an academic member of the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers. Special Focus: Farm management and livestock production economics. e-mail address: k-stokes@tamu.edu

Gregory S. Taylor: Professor, Program Leader for Community Development, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Texas A&M University System, and serves as Associate Head in the Department of Rural Sociology. Received his B.S. and M.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Illinois and Ph.D. from the from the University of Kentucky in Rural Sociology and Agricultural Economics. In his research, Dr. Taylor concentrates on linkages between agriculture and rural communities. e-mail address: g-taylor@tamu.edu

Merritt J. Taylor: Extension Economist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Received his B.S. in Animal Science, M.S. in Agricultural Economics from New Mexico State University and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University. Dr. Taylor's research is on educational programs for agricultural businesses in financial planning and management, budgeting, investment analysis and marketing, production economics, tax management, risk management using the futures market, marketing of products domestically and for export and international trade. Dr. Taylor is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association, Western Agricultural Economics Association, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, International Agricultural Economics Association and the Texas Vegetable Association. e-mail address: m-taylor15@tamu.edu

John F. (Jack) Thigpen III: Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist in Economic Development in the Department of Rural Sociology with an adjunct appointment in the Department of Agricultural Economics. Received both his B.S. in Agricultural Business, M.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Tennessee, and Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Kentucky. His research program focuses on sustainable natural resource-based economic development in rural communities and counties. Dr. Thigpen is editor of the Natural Resources Research Group newsletter of the Rural Sociological Society and secretary/treasurer of the Southern Rural Sociological Association. He is also a member of Gamma Sigma Delta, the honor society of agriculture; the Conservation and Forest History Society; and the Wildlife Society.

Paul B. Thompson: Director of the Center for Biotechnology Policy and Ethics and Professor of Philosophy of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University where he also holds the Maria Julia and George R. Jordan Jr. Professorship in Public Policy. Received a B.A. in Philosophy, at Emory University, his M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy, at State University of New York at Stony Brook. Thompson is also Texas A&M University's delegate to the Operating Committee of the National Agricultural Biotechnology Council. He has served as President of the Agriculture, Food and Human Values Association, and was Director of Graduate Studies in Philosophy at Texas A&M University during the inaugural two years of the M.A. program in philosophy there. He has been a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and at the National Center for Food and Agricultural Policy, Resources for the Future. Special Focus: Risk, agricultural and environmental ethics.

Mark L. Waller: Assistant Professor and Extension Economist-Grain Marketing and Policy in the Department of Agricultural Economist at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. with a double major in Plant and Soil Science and Agricultural Education, M.S., in Agricultural Economics, both from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, and Ph.D., majoring in Agricultural Economics from the University of Illinois. Dr. Waller's current research emphasis is in the area of price risk management and market analysis for producers, handlers, processors, and other users of wheat, corn, grain sorghum, rice, soybeans, and their products. He is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association and the Southern Agricultural Economics Association. Special Focus: Marketing and price analysis policy. e-mail address: mwaller@tamu.edu

Christopher M. Whatley: Lecturer in computer applications in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Range Science, M.S. in Forest Science from Texas A&M University, and Ph.D. in Forest Science. His research interests are concerned with operations research strategies to improve efficiency in the working environment. Mr. Whatley began his teaching appointment within the Department of Agricultural Economics in September 1991. He has teaching responsibilities in undergraduate computer applications. Through his course, students learn basic and advanced concepts using software such as DOS, WordPerfect, Lotus, and DBase. e-mail address: cwhatley@tamu.edu

Gary W. Williams: Professor of Agricultural Economics and Coordinator of the Texas Agricultural Market Research Center (TAMRC) in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Received his B.S. in Economics from Brigham Young University, M.S. and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Purdue University. His areas of teaching and research emphasis include international agricultural trade, agricultural policy, marketing and price analysis, and quantitative research methods. TAMRC has four major research divisions: International Market Research, Consumer and Product Market Research, Commodity Market Research, and Contemporary Market Issues Research. Special Focus: Marketing, international trade, and policy. e-mail address: gwwilliams@tamu.edu

Houshmand Ziari: Assistant Research Scientist with Texas A&M University. Received his B.S., in Business Management from the College of Mass Communication Science in Tehran, M.S. in Business Administration from the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Ph.D in Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University. The current focus of his research includes development of an integrated economic model for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Agricultural Operations; development of a production planning model for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Packing Plant; optimal location of grain cleaning capacity; and effects of U.S. and Mexico trade liberalization on the U.S. onion market. e-mail address: ziari@tamu.edu